When Joe Biden Asks A Question About Wildfires, The White House Cuts The Livestream In The Middle Of His Question

The White House has yet to reply to the situation, but it is not the first time this has happened. Last month, the Livestream was halted as the US president was going to respond to a reporter's question about the withdrawal of American forces from Afghanistan.

When Joe Biden Asks A Question About Wildfires, The White House Cuts The Livestream In The Middle Of His Question
When Joe Biden Asks A Question About Wildfires, The White House Cuts The Livestream In The Middle Of His Question

The White House interrupted the live feed of US President Joe Biden's speech in Idaho, where he met with officials to discuss the wildfires devastating the western United States, unexpectedly. The event occurred as Biden was posing a question to a member of the crowd.

That person was George Geissler of the national association of state foresters.
"Can I ask you a question?" Biden asked.
"Of course," Geissler responded.
"One of the things that I've been working on with some others is..." the US president had spoken only this much when the feed was cut and was replaced with a "Thank you for joining" message. The clip was posted on Twitter by the Republican National Committee.

The White House has yet to comment to the situation. 
This isn't the first time something like this has happened to the 78-year-old President of the United States. When Biden was going to answer a reporter's question regarding American forces leaving Afghanistan, the live stream was interrupted last month. When the connection was interrupted in March, Biden was attending a Democratic Party event and indicated he was "glad to answer" inquiries, according to Fox News.

The buzz about the President's abrupt stop to his address has grown since Politico published a report last week quoting White House officials as claiming that they "mute" Biden's remarks out of fear that he may deviate from the planned agenda provided by his office. 

Meanwhile, President Trump used his trip to Idaho and other western states to defend his $3.5 trillion rebuilding plans in the face of wildfires raging across the region. Year-round fires and other extreme weather, he said, are a climate change fact that the country can no longer ignore.“We can't ignore the reality that these wildfires are being supercharged by climate change,” Biden said, noting that catastrophic weather doesn't strike based on partisan ideology. “It isn't about red or blue states. It's about fires. Just fires.”