Imran Khan Claims After The SCO Summit, Pakistan Began Talks With Taliban

Is Pakistan stronger than the US because it aided the Taliban in defeating US-Afghan forces, Imran Khan questioned, dismissing claims of Pak-Taliban collusion?

Imran Khan Claims After The SCO Summit, Pakistan Began Talks With Taliban
Imran Khan Claims After The SCO Summit, Pakistan Began Talks With Taliban

After the Afghanistan issue was discussed in depth at the recently completed Shanghai Corporation Organisation conference, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan declared on Saturday that Pakistan has begun a conversation with the Taliban for an inclusive government in Afghanistan."After 40 years of conflict, this inclusivity will ensure peace and a stable Afghanistan, which is in the interest not only of Afghanistan but the region as well," Imran Khan tweeted.

The Taliban have declared a temporary Cabinet, which is now seeking international recognition, after conquering the country in an unexpected coup on August 15. While China has provided cooperation and Qatar, where the Taliban maintain a political office, has engaged with the leadership, no country has yet recognised the Taliban government. 

Despite international condemnation of Pakistan's support for the Taliban, Pakistani politicians have thrown their support behind the Taliban regime. Imran Khan has also addressed this topic in a number of appearances with international media and at the SCO's international platform.

"If Pakistan helped the Taliban win against the US, it means Pakistan is stronger than the US and all of Europe, and so strong that it was able to make a lightly armed militia of around 60,000 fighters beat a well-equipped armed of 3,00,000," Imran Khan said in an interview with Pakistan's Dunya News, dismissing the claim of Pakistani assistance. 

Imran Khan has stated that the world should give the Taliban regime more time and that it is erroneous to believe that any outside force will be able to resolve the country's problems. Imran Khan reaffirmed his position on the decade-long conflict, saying that Pakistan had paid a high price for partnering with the US.