Biden's Economic Campaign Revived, Intends To Shift His Focus Away From Afghanistan

Even as Congress tries to push President Joe Biden's dual infrastructure proposals in the hopes of ultimate passage, the White House is planning to make new announcements on a number of his unfulfilled campaign promises this fall.

Biden's Economic Campaign Revived, Intends To Shift His Focus Away From Afghanistan
Biden's Economic Campaign Revived, Intends To Shift His Focus Away From Afghanistan

Several of Biden's economic campaign promises, such as reducing student loan debt and establishing a first-time homebuyer tax credit, were not included in the bipartisan or budget reconciliation infrastructure packages, which combined would amount to roughly $5 trillion in new spending projects.

Those officials stressed to the Washington Examiner that "the president and his whole team are proud of and are fighting for the substance of his Build Back Better agenda, which is fully paid for by asking big corporations and the wealthiest Americans to pay their fair share and by empowering Medicare to negotiate lower prices with pharmaceutical companies."

"We need to reduce prescription medication costs, address climate change, and assist families in affording childcare, senior care, and education; and we need to prolong the largest middle-class tax reduction in American history," one official said in a statement. "Consider all the ways you might save money for your family. Furthermore, Build Back Better and the bipartisan infrastructure measure will lower inflation by increasing the efficiency of our economy, making things easier to move, and making it easier to enter the labour force – all without increasing the debt."

The official maintained that "these are complex processes, but as recent weeks have demonstrated, leaders in Congress and the president know how to move them forward."

Senior Democratic and Republican officials told the Washington Examiner that while the administration would have always pushed Biden's unfulfilled campaign promises, the White House is desperately looking for new narratives to focus on following America's troop withdrawal from Afghanistan and the ensuing humanitarian evacuation.